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  • pit 7:32 pm on February 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply
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    API Bridge version 1.1: plug-in creation package released! 

    The announced new version of API Bridge is out! With the new 1.1 release it is finally possible to create custom plugins that access all the Symbian functionalities, so practically opening up the doors to a new generation of Flash Lite, Web Runtime and Java ME applications.

    Start downloading the new release from Forum Nokia: API Bridge release 1.1.

    Then, check out this informative Wiki articles, that explain how to build a new, custom plugin and how to use it from JavaScript:

    For more information about API Bridge, check out its Forum Nokia page.

    • Mallikarjun 3:13 pm on March 22, 2010 Permalink

      Hey Anybody knows how to crate new plugin dll with APIBridge. My DLL is not getting invoked when i call from echoTest widget sample.

  • pit 11:58 pm on February 9, 2010 Permalink | Reply
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    How to use Nokia API Bridge in Flash Lite with FDT 

    API Bridge is a Symbian engine that exposes a set of native functionalities to Web Runtime, Flash Lite and Java ME applications. Nokia has recently released an ActionScript library that allows to easily integrate APIBridge functionalities in a Flash Lite application.

    In this article I’ll try to explain how to setup and develop a Flash Lite application that uses APIBridge, by using FDT.

    If you want to know how to configure FDT (and Eclipse) to properly develop Flash Lite application, you should read this article: Web Runtime and Flash Lite integrated development on Eclipse.

    Setup the project in FDT

    First of all, you need to download the API Bridge FlashLite library from Forum Nokia: API Bridge Flash Lite Library and Sample Code. The package also contains useful sample code that will definitely help.

    Now, create a new Flash Lite project within Eclipse.

    Then, open up the API Bridge package downloaded from Forum Nokia, and copy the “si/” folder to the “src/” folder of your Flash Lite project.

    Once copied, you should notice some errors in your FDT project, as shown in the picture below.

    These errors are due to the “mx.*” package, that is not included in the ActionScript classes shipped with FDT. To solve this error, you have to tell FDT where to find these classes.

    First, let’s copy these classes from the Flash IDE to a dedicated folder:

    1. Create a folder called “mx_package/” somewhere on your machine
    2. Go into “<FLASH_IDE_PATH>\en\First Run\Classes\” folder
    3. Copy the “mx/” folder inside the “mx_package/” folder created above

    Now, configure FDT:

    1. Go into “Window” -> “Preferences” -> “FDT” -> “Core Libraries”, open the “Path variables” panel and select “New…”
    2. Enter “MX_PACKAGE” as name, and select the “mx_package/” created above as folder
    3. Once done, your Core Libraries should look similar to the picture below

    Now, what remains to do is to add the MX library to the Flash Lite project. Go into the project’s properties and, in the “FDT Build Path” section, select “Add Linked Library…” -> “Add…” and pick “MX_PACKAGE”.

    Done this, all the errors should have gone away from the project. Hurrah! :)

    Patching the mx.utils.Delegate class

    The MTASC compiler is stricter than the compiler you can find within the Flash IDE. For this reason, the mx.utils.Delegate class needs to be slightly modified in order to make it properly compile with MTASC.

    Specifically, the ‘create()’ function needs to be adjusted as follows:

    static function create(obj:Object, func:Function):Function
    	var f = function()
    		var target = arguments.callee.target;
    		var func2 = arguments.callee.func;
    		return func2.apply(target, arguments);
    	f.target = obj;
    	f.func = func;
    	return f;

    Patching the si.apibridge.APIBridge class

    For the same reasons explained above, also the si.apibridge.APIBridge class needs to be patched to work with MTASC.  To do this, open APIBridge.as and replace the setPort() function with this one:

    	private function setPort(): Void
    		var portVars:LoadVars = new LoadVars();
    		portVars.load( portPath );
    		var pushErrorDelegate : Function = Delegate.create(this, pushError);
    		portVars.onLoad = function( success )
    			if (success)
    				var portData:String = portVars.toString();
    				portData = portData.substr(0,portData.indexOf("="));
    				APIBridge.BridgeURL += portData; 
    				trace("Error loading Port");// The data didn't load
    				pushErrorDelegate("1","Error loading port, using default 9080");
    				APIBridge.BridgeURL += "9080";

    Once done, just create a new MTASC launch configuration and check that the project properly compiles. If it doesn’t, re-check the steps above.

    Using API Bridge Call Log service in Flash Lite

    Now, we’ll see how to use an API Bridge service, the Call Log one, in Flash Lite.

    First, let’s create the main project’s class. In this example I’ll call it ‘MainMovie’.

    import com.jappit.flashlite.apibridgetest.Logger;
    import com.jappit.flashlite.apibridgetest.CallLogRetriever;
    class com.jappit.flashlite.apibridgetest.MainMovie
    	public static function main(container : MovieClip) : Void
    		Stage.align = "TL";
    		Stage.scaleMode = "noScale";
    		container.createTextField("tf", 1, 0, 0, 360, 500);
    		var textField : TextField = container["tf"];

    The TextField instance will be used to show the events retrieved from the device logs. Now, let’s create a separate class, EventsLogRetriever, that will take care of calling APIBridge, and of managing its responses. Its constructor is defined to accept a TextField as argument, and it will use it to print out the API Bridge response.

    import mx.utils.Delegate;
    import si.apibridge.*;
    class com.jappit.flashlite.apibridgetest.EventsLogRetriever
    	private var textField : TextField;
    	public function EventsLogRetriever(_textField : TextField)
    		this.textField = _textField;

    Now, it’s time to define the method that will call the API Bridge engine. Each call to an API Bridge interface must typically define two handlers: a success and a failure handler. The error handler receives a single argument, containing the data of the occurred error. About the success handler, it receives three arguments:

    1. the transaction ID, that must be used to uniquely identify the transaction that is calling the handler (useful in scenarios where multiple transactions are active concurrently)
    2. the event ID, that identify the state of the event
    3. an object containing data returned by the API Bridge call

    Said that, the EventsLogRetriever class will end up containing these 3 methods:

    public function retrieveEvents() : Void
    public function onApiError(outParam : Object) : Void
    public function onApiSuccess(transactionID:Number, eventID:String, outParam:Object)

    Starting with the retrieveEvents() method, it has to:

    • instantiate APIBridge, passing a reference to the error handler as argument
    • grab a reference to the Logging service
    • define which kind of log events it wants to retrieve
    • call the GetList() service method

    So, the retrieveEvents() can be implemented as follows:

    public function retrieveEvents() : Void
    	var _onApiError : Function = Delegate.create(this, onApiError);
    	var _onApiSuccess : Function = Delegate.create(this, onApiSuccess);
    	var bridge:APIBridge = new APIBridge(_onApiError);
    	var logging = bridge.Service("Service.Logging", "IDataSource");
    	textField.text  = "Retrieving phone numbers ..." + APIBridge.BridgeURL;
    	var filter = {EventType:0};
    	var inParams = {Type:"Log", Filter:filter};
    	logging.GetList(inParams, _onApiSuccess);

    Coming to the error handler, let’s just implement it to make it show the returned error data:

    public function onApiError(outParam : Object) : Void
    	textField.text  = "APIBridge error " + outParam.ErrorCode + " " + outParam.ErrorMessage;

    Now, the success handler. First, it has to check if the returned API Bridge data contains an error, and this can be done with the same logic used in the error handler above. If no errors are detected, the handler can retrieve the actual returned data, contained in outParam.ReturnValue, and loop all the returned log events.

    public function onApiSuccess(transactionID : Number, eventID : String, outParam : Object)
    	textField.text = "Results: " + outParam.ReturnValue.length + "\n" ;
    	if (outParam.ErrorCode != 0)
    		textField.text = "Error: " + outParam.ErrorCode + ", " + outParam.ErrorMessage;
    		var outList = outParam.ReturnValue;
    		var outputEntry = null;
    			outputEntry = outList.next();
    			if (null != outputEntry)
    				textField.text += outputEntry.Direction + ": " +
    					outputEntry.Description + ", " +
    				textField.text += "\n";
    		while (true);

    Done this, the EventsLogRetriever is ready to be used, and to do this it’ll be enough to add this two lines to the static() method of the MainMovie class:

    var retriever : EventsLogRetriever = new EventsLogRetriever(textField);

    That’s all!

    Build and deploy

    Once the Flash Lite app is ready, just build it using the MTASC launch configuration created before.

    Now the tough part: to make the whole thing work, it is necessary to package the Flash Lite application with the API Bridge engine. To do this, there are various options:

    1. Build a Flash Lite launcher in Symbian C++. These Forum Nokia Wiki articles explain how this can be done:
    2. Package the Flash Lite application in a WRT widget, and then package it with the API Bridge engine. This approach is described in these articles:

    Both the approaches can equally work, so feel free to choose the one you prefer :)

    Once deployed on a device, just run it, and you should see this:

    1) The Flash Lite app starts, and the API Engine is initialized

    2) The API Bridge engine asks the user for permission to access sensitive data

    3) And here are the retrieved log events!

  • pit 11:04 pm on February 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply
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    How to use FDT and Aptana to create a Flash Lite enabled WRT widget 

    We’ve seen, in this previous post, how to setup Eclipse in order to develop both Web Runtime widgets and Flash Lite applications, thanks to Aptana, the Nokia Web Runtime plugin and FDT. This article will focus on how to create a Web Runtime widget that includes some Flash Lite content.

    First of all, be sure to have installed all the required Eclipse plugins, as described here.

    Create a new Web Runtime widget

    To create a Web Runtime widget, just open up the “New Project” wizard and select the “New Nokia Web Runtime Widget”.

    The wizard will now let you choose from some predefined widget templates. In this article, it is enough to start with an empty widget.

    And finally enter the name and identifier of your new widget. The identifier has to be a string in the reverse domain format, and will uniquely identify your own widget.

    Once created, the widget’s structure should be the one shown below.

    Create the Flash Lite content

    First, create a new Flash Lite project by using the “New Flash Project” template. Then, create the project’s main class. One example is the MainMovie class shown below:

    class com.jappit.flashlitetest1.MainMovie
    	public function MainMovie()
    	public static function main(container : MovieClip) : Void
    		Stage.align = "TL";
    		Stage.scaleMode = "noScale";
    		container.createTextField("tf", 1, 0, 0, 100, 100);
    		var tf : TextField = container["tf"];
    		tf.text = "I'm the Flash Lite content!";

    Changing the MTASC launch configuration

    Now, the MTASC command has to be changed a bit, so that the generated SWF will automatically end up in the Web Runtime widget project’s folder.

    To do this, open up the MTASC launch configuration, and change the generated SWF path to be a subpath of your widget’s main folder. You can see an example of the command in the picture below.

    Now, run the project launch configuration, and check the widget’s folder: the SWF generated by MTASC should be there, together with the other widget’s files.

    Including the SWF content in your widget

    Forum Nokia Wiki has a comprehensive article explaining the possible ways of integrating Flash content into a Web Runtime widget. In this article the first described approach, the same used on the Web, is implemented.

    So, take the widget’s index.html file, and add this HTML code:

    <object id="MyFlash" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" width="200" height="200" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0">
    	<param name="align" value="middle" />
    	<param name="allowScriptAccess" value="sameDomain" />
    	<param name="loop" value="false" />
    	<param name="menu" value="false" />
    	<param name="quality" value="high" />
    	<param name="wmode" value="opaque" />
    	<param name="bgcolor" value="#ffffff" />
    	<param name="src" value="default_mtasc.swf" />
    	<param name="name" value="Finish" />
    	<embed id="MyFlash" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="200" height="200" src="default_mtasc.swf" name="Finish" bgcolor="#ffffff" wmode="opaque" quality="high" menu="false" loop="false" allowscriptaccess="sameDomain" align="middle"></embed>

    Packaging and deploying

    If all went well, all is ready to be packaged and deployed.

    Right click the project, choose “Package widget”, deploy and enjoy! :)

    You can download the widget built in this article here: Flash Lite enabled WRT sample widget.

    • Wez 11:42 pm on February 8, 2010 Permalink

      Thanks for the write up man.

    • Bill Perry 10:05 am on February 9, 2010 Permalink

      nice article, thanks for posting.

    • pit 10:20 am on February 9, 2010 Permalink

      Thank you! Glad to know you liked the article :)

  • pit 4:51 pm on February 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , mtasc, ,   

    Web Runtime and Flash Lite integrated development on Eclipse 

    Nokia devices offer a wide range of technologies and languages that can be used to create mobile applications. Two of these are strictly related each other, and can be used together to create applications that benefit of both sides: Flash Lite and Web Runtime.

    For this reason, in this article I’ll try to explain how to setup a single environment that may allow development on both technologies, so leveraging the development phase from continuous swaps between different IDEs, and by boosting it all thanks to the powerful Eclipse platform.

    Installing Eclipse and plugins

    First of all, download Eclipse. I currently use version 3.5 on my own machine, but other versions should work as well.

    Once downloaded, proceed installing the following plugins:

    1. Aptana plugin for Eclipse: http://www.aptana.org/studio/plugin
    2. Web Runtime plugin for Aptana: http://tools.ext.nokia.com/wrt/prod/aptana/plugin/
    3. FDT plugin for Eclipse: http://www.fdt.powerflasher.com/developer-tools/fdt-3/download/

    After you’ve installed the above plugins, you’ll notice two new project types in your Eclipse project wizard: Flash and Nokia Web Runtime projects.

    Basically, these 3 plugins are all you need to start developing both Web Runtime and Flash Lite applications. Anyway, FDT needs some further configuration steps to properly work with Flash Lite apps.

    Configure the FDT plugin

    FDT needs to know how to compile your Flash Lite projects. You basically have two choices: use the Adobe Flash IDE, or use MTASC.

    • The first choice is available if you have already installed a copy of a Flash IDE, and can be configured by going into the “Window” -> “Preferences” -> “FDT” -> “Tools” -> “Flash” settings panel. Once there, just enter the paths of your Flash IDE and Player.

    • The second one, quicker and free, needs MTASC to be installed on your machine (you can get it here), and configured in the “Window” -> “Preferences” -> “FDT” -> “Tools” -> “MTASC” panel. I actually prefer this option, as it allows you to develop Flash Lite applications also on machines where the Flash IDE is not available.

    Add Flash Lite-specific classes and functions

    FDT uses the standard ActionScript 2 classes to allow you to compile your Flash Lite project. Anyway, these lack some Flash Lite-specific classes and functions, as ExtendedKey and SharedObject.addListener() method, that have to be manually added, as also explained here.

    To do this, go into the “<ECLIPSE_ROOT_FOLDER>\configuration\com.powerflasher.fdt.core\.config\core\as2\” folder and:

    1. Create a file called “ExtendedKey.as” with this content:
      intrinsic class ExtendedKey
      static var SOFT1:String = "soft1";
      static var SOFT2:String = "soft2";
      static var SOFT3:String = "soft3";
      static var SOFT4:String = "soft4";
      static var SOFT5:String = "soft5";
      static var SOFT6:String = "soft6";
      static var SOFT7:String = "soft7";
      static var SOFT8:String = "soft8";
      static var SOFT9:String = "soft9";
      static var SOFT10:String = "soft10";
      static var SOFT11:String = "soft11";
      static var SOFT12:String = "soft12";
    2. Open “SharedObject.as” and add these lines to the class definition:
      var scope : Object;
      static function GetMaxSize() : Number;
      static function addListener(objectName:String, notifyFunction:Function) : Void;
      static function removeListener(objectName:String) : Void;
    3. Now, switch to the “<ECLIPSE_ROOT_FOLDER>\configuration\com.powerflasher.fdt.core\.config\topLevel\” folder, open TopLevel.as, and add this function definition:
      function fscommand2(command:String, parameters:Object):Void;

      If you plan to use MTASC to compile your Flash Lite applications, the above changes have to be performed also to the ActionScript files used by MTASC itself. These files are typically placed in the “<MTASC_ROOT_FOLDER>\std” folder: go there and repeat the 3 steps above for ExtendedKey.as, SharedObject.as and TopLevel.as.

      That’s all! Now let’s give FDT a quick test to check if all is correctly configured.

      Testing the FDT configuration

      Creating a new Flash Lite project is straightforward: just select “New Flash project” from the Eclipse project wizard, and then choose a name for your project. In the Project Language section, be sure to select “ActionScript 2″.

      Once the project has been created, switch to the “Flash FDT” perspective by selecting “Window” -> “Open perspective” -> “Flash FDT”.

      Now, create the project’s main class. The only required method to be implemented is the static main(), that has to perform all the initialization operations:

      class com.jappit.flashlitetest1.MainMovie
        public function MainMovie()
        public static function main(container : MovieClip) : Void
          Stage.align = "TL";
          Stage.scaleMode = "noScale";
          container.createTextField("tf", 1, 0, 0, 100, 100);
          var tf : TextField = container["tf"];
          tf.text = "Hello World";

      Now, if the FDT configuration was properly done, you shouldn’t get any errors. So, if all is ok, open the “Run Configurations…” panel from the “Run” menu.

      Under “FDT MTASC” create a new launch configuration. In the “Main” sub-panel select the main class created just above.

      Then, go to the “Miscellaneous” sub-panel and check the “Start SWF after compilation” option. This way, the SWF will be immediately launched, after each build, in the Eclipse’s internal SWF viewer.

      Now, all is ready to be tested: just run the created launch configuration, and enjoy your new Flash Lite app :)

      And here’s the generated SWF running on a real device:

      What’s next?

      Next tutorials will focus on using both Web Runtime and FDT plugins to develop Flash Lite-enabled widgets. So, stay tuned!

    • pit 12:38 pm on February 5, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      How to capture photos in a Web Runtime widget using APIBridge 

      One of the best features that APIBridge brings to Web Runtime widgets is, without doubts, the ability to capture photos, videos and audio.

      If you don’t know how to build a widget that includes APIBridge functionalities, you should read this article: Build your first Web Runtime widget with APIBridge.

      Now, let’s start with photos, and create a very basic widget with a button that will be used to take a snapshot.

      This is the HTML code used to create this simple widget:

      <body onload="init();">
      	<img id="capture_button" src="images/capture.png" />
      	<img id="captured_photo" />

      The ‘captured_photo’ <img> tag will be used to show the captured photo, so it is just empty at the beginning.

      Before proceeding, it is necessary to include the APIBridge JavaScript library to the widget:

      <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript" src="js/apibridge.js"></script>

      Now, in the init() function, that is called when the widget loads, attach the ‘onclick’ event to the above button:


      Now, the interesting part: the takePhoto() method has to call APIBridge, and start the photo capturing. This is done by using the newFileService method, that accepts 3 arguments:

      • the type of file (it can be: APIBridge.NewFileType.Image for photos, APIBridge.NewFileType.Video for video, and APIBridge.NewFileType.Audio for audio files)
      • the onSuccess event handler
      • the onError event handler

      So, the takePhoto() function calls the APIBridge.newFileService method as shown below:

      function takePhoto()

      Now, what remains to do, is to define the onSuccess and onError event handlers.

      The photoCaptureSuccess() function receives as argument the full path of the new image or, if no image was taken, it just receive NULL.  The following function check if its argument is defined, and then sets the source of ‘captured_photo’ by using the image path.

      function photoCaptureSuccess(photoSource)
        if (photoSource && photoSource.length)
          document.getElementById('captured_photo').src = photoSource;
          alert("No image taken...");

      The error handler receives as argument the Ajax request used to perform the call to APIBridge. In this case, it is enough to display an error message, informing the user that an error occurred:

      function photoCaptureError(ajaxReq)
        alert("Error " + ajaxReq.status);

      Now, all is ready to test the widget. Let’s build and package it as described here, and here it is in action on a real device!

      • Jack 4:03 am on October 12, 2010 Permalink

        I have try this code, but i confuse for the “Now, in the init() function, that is called when the widget loads, attach the ‘onclick’ event to the above button:”….anyone can help me?

    • pit 5:37 pm on February 3, 2010 Permalink | Reply
      Tags: , , , hello world,   

      Build your first Web Runtime widget with APIBridge 

      This article shows you how to create, compile, build and deploy a Web Runtime widget, that includes the APIBridge plugin developed by Nokia, and available on Forum Nokia website.

      The APIBridge is a Symbian C++ engine that exposes native functionalities to Web Runtime widgets. These functionalities include:

      • Uploading files.
      • Capturing video, image, and audio.
      • Reading files.
      • Resizing images.

      Before starting with the following steps, you have to download APIBridge from Forum Nokia website, and unpack it to a convenient location on your machine.

      Also, to compile and build the whole example, you must get one UID from your SymbianSigned account.

      Step 1. Prepare your widget

      The first step is to develop your own widget, and to package it into the standard WGZ format. You can develop the widget with the tools of your choice.

      In this tutorial, I’ll just build a simple “Hello World” widget with the WRT Plugin for Aptana Studio. You can read a full guide about creating from scratch a simple widget on Forum Nokia Library.

      Using the Aptana Wizard interface, let’s create a new “Nokia Web Runtime Widget”.

      Now, let’s customize the “index.html” file with your Hello World text.

      So, the test widget is ready to be packaged!

      Step 2. Compiling APIBridge source code

      Now, take the folder where you have unpacked APIBridge, and make a copy of its WgzInstaller folder. We’ll use this copy to create the new widget installer.

      Note: to perform this step, you must already have your own UID.

      Now, perform these changes:

      1. Open the group\WgzInstaller.mmp file, and replace the fake UID 0×12345678 with your own
      2. In the src\WgzInstaller.cpp file file, replace the KWidgetInstallerFileName with the actual filename of your packaged widget

      Now all is ready to compile your source code. Go into the group\ folder and, from command line, run:

      bldmake bldfiles
      abld build gcce

      If you don’t get any errors, the APIBridge code shoud have been correctly compiled.

      Step 3. Customize and package

      Now, copy your packaged widget to the content/ folder. Done this, open the /sis/WgzInstaller_template.pkg file and set the appropriate values for these properties:

      • Application name
      • Installation UID
      • Vendor name
      • .wgz file name

      Since we’re building from command line, we also have to tell where makesis can actually find the WgzInstaller.exe file created in the previous step. In this tutorial, I’ve used the S60 5th edition SDK v1.0, so I’ll change this value:




      Now, let’s create the SIS file: from command prompt, go into the sis/ folder and run:

      makesis WgzInstaller_template.pkg

      Your output should be something like this:

      Processing WgzInstaller_template.pkg...
      Created  WgzInstaller_template.sis.

      Step 4. Sign and deploy

      Take the SIS file you’ve created in the previous step, and sign it with your own SymbianSigned certificate:

      signsis WgzInstaller_template.sis WgzInstaller_template_signed.sis your_certificate.cer your_key.key your_password

      Now, your widget is ready! Just send it to your Nokia device, and install. You’ll notice that, during the installation, you’ll be prompted to install both your widget and the APIBridge engine.

      Below you can see the Hello World widget running in all its glory :)

      Thanks go to Leonardo for his precious support! :)

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